Yes, God Cares About Football: My Two Cents on Tebow-Mania

Jan 12, 2012

By Tommy Young

I have read a lot of articles, web posts and blogs about “Tebow-mania” in the past three or four months. I have shook my head and felt frustration with those that don’t understand faith, God or Tim Tebow.

I have read all the criticisms about how religion has no place in football and how Tebow is a “hypocrite” because he prays publicly and that, “If there is a God, he should be worried about things more important than a silly football game.” I have even read about Tebow’s “arrogance” in believing that he has been favored by God while believers on other teams are somehow being punished.

But in the past couple of days I have found two interesting and uplifting takes on the topic. First is a blog by Dr. John Mark Hendricks, a professor at Lipscomb University, a Christian college in Tennessee. Hendricks and I share the same viewpoint on the issue of God caring about such trivial things like football.

He writes, “Can God use a football game for the sake of his kingdom? Absolutely. To think otherwise is to remove God from the daily moments of our lives. That God is too small.”

I do see validity in people’s argument that there are some major things going on in our world today that need God’s attention. What a lot of those people don’t seem to grasp is that God is in the midst of human trials and suffering even today.

Why is He there? Because He has a plan and wants to take an active role in the lives of the people that are in and around the less-than-ideal circumstances.

Psalm 139 is a beautiful expression of the psalmist’s understanding of God’s omnipresence and omniscience. In particular, I love verses 17-18 which can be translated, “How amazing are your thoughts concerning me, God! How vast is the sum of them! Were I to count them, they would outnumber the grains of sand…”

God is so big He can consider the troubles of the sick and down-trodden of the world at the same time He can be interested in Tim Tebow offering Him praise and worship in the form of playing football to the best of his ability.

God considers every situation and circumstance with equal care and concern, because people are involved. Hicks writes, “God loves play, but God loves play because God loves people. God is not a football fan; God is a Tebow fan…and your fan as well. God is especially fond of each of us.”

Secondly, I heard a great song written about Tebow. In my opinion, John Parr, best known for his 1985 chart topper “St. Elmo’s Fire” (Man in Motion), truly captured the heart of Tim Tebow and his journey as a messenger of God’s love. Here are the words to “Just a Man:”

I am just a man doin’ the best I can;

Not looking for glory, not looking for fame;

Just doin’ my best in a game.

I was just a boy when my mother shared His joy.

She read His words with tears in her eye,

Filled me with power, filled me with pride.

Standing before you, the crowd on their feet,

We’re snatching victory from jaws of defeat.

Out on the field, down on one knee,

The power and glory for you only will be.

Over and over and over again, I need your love, I need your love.

Over and over and over again, giving it all I can; I am just a man.

I am just a man following His plan.

Not looking for glory, ain’t lookin’ for fame, just trying my best in a game.

Standing before you, the crowd on their feet,

I won’t let this crusade go down in defeat.

Out on the field, down on one knee, I pray for the power you put in me.

Over and over and over again, I need your love, I need your love.

Over and over and over again, I am part of His plan; I am just a man.

I was just a boy when my mother shared His joy.

She read His words with tears in her eye,

Filled me with power, filled me with pride.

Standing before you, the crowd on their feet,

A bow in my hand, aimin’ for victory, But I am just a man.

(If you want to read all of Hicks’ blog, here’s the link: Hicks blog article

And Parr’s song can be found here, performed by him: Parr song for Tebow)

 

By Tommy Young, AIA Communications

(The opinions, beliefs and viewpoints expressed in this editorial are those of the author, Tommy Young, and do not necessarily represent those of Athletes in Action or any other individuals with AIA.)